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Did you know that something comes out of your face when you sleep? Read to find out more

Messymellycara 2d

Did you know that something comes out of your face when you sleep? Read to find out more

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You almost certainly have animals living on your face.


You can't see them, but they're there. They are microscopic mites, eight-legged creatures rather like spiders. Almost every human being has them. They spend their entire lives on our faces, where they eat, mate and finally die.


During the day, the animals stay hidden in your follicles, feeding on oils naturally secreted by your glands. At night, they use their stubby legs to climb to the surface to find mates.


Perhaps the most startling fact about these mites: they were first identified in 1842, but scientists still know surprisingly little about them.

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For most people, most of the time, they're harmless. They may even be beneficial. For instance, they may clear dead skin off our faces or eat harmful skin bacteria.


Before you start buying extra-strong facewash, you should know that these microscopic lodgers probably aren't a serious problem. They may well be almost entirely harmless. What's more, because they are so common they could help reveal our history in unparalleled detail.


THINK of all the adults you know. your parents and grandparents. the teachers you had at school, your doctors and dentists, the people who collect your rubbish, and the actors you see on TV. All of these people probably have little mites crawling, eating, sleeping, and having sx on their faces.


There are more than 48,000 species of mites. As far as we know, exactly two of those live on human faces. 


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Don't freak out, but right now there are probably miniscule mites eating, mating and going about the daily business of their lives — on your face. 


Plenty of microscopic organisms inhabit our bodies. Microbes like bacteria and viruses are some better-known residents of this ecosystem, but teeny tiny animals also call the human face home. In a recent installment of the video series "Gross Science.


The only way we know about their nightlife, in fact, is from experiments in which people slept with tape on their skin to trap the mites when they emerge.


Daytime sampling methods are a little simpler: you can isolate mites by putting mineral oil on the pores near your nose, causing them to open up, then scraping them with a piece of metal. If you put the resulting goo under a microscope, you'll likely see mites wriggling around inside.


99.9 percent of humans carry them," says Ron Ochoa, a mite scientist at the US Department of Agriculture. They're most abundant on our faces, but live in the hair follicles all over our bodies, and a single person may harbor more than one million of them in total.


We Joke That the mites Come out to party, Because they have sx on your face at night.


Naturally they glom onto the oiliest parts of the face, which means they typically hang out around the forehead, cheeks, and chin. That's where they breed, but they don't live long; their life cycle is about two weeks long.

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Interestingly enough, we aren't born with facial mites. They're typically passed by skin-to-skin contact during childhood. These eight-legged creatures are technically arachnids and are distantly related to our other favorite bugs: ticks and spiders.


Demodex mites pose no known threats to humans – that is unless they over-proliferate. Most people live peacefully with their face mites until old age. Just think, in your lifetime, your nose could serve as the family home to hundreds of generations of grease-swilling, nocturnal-partying arachnids. 

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