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United States Covid-19 cases on the rise again

CyberJess 06/25/2020

by Jessica Arendse

Governor Greg Abbott called the rising rate of Coronavirus cases in certain American states as "unacceptable." 

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On Monday, California hit a striking 5,019 new cases, Florida hit 3,289 confirmations in one day, Arizona hit 3,591 new cases in one day, while Texas health authorities confirmed that their cases are rising at the fastest rate. 

Abbott told residents of Texas that further state actions would be announced should the virus continue spreading at its current rate. "Because the spread is so rampant right now, there's never a reason for you to have to leave your home. Unless you do need to go out, the safest place for you is at your home," the governor added. 

He also added that the state is to reinforce precautions of wearing masks and social distancing. The warning came days after the Texas Alcohol Beverage Commission temporarily suspended alcohol permits of at least 12 bars in the state, who were found in violation of coronavirus-related protocols.

Among 26 states, where the other states are also seeing new cases increase, compared to the previous week. Those states include Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming. An expert mentioned that too many places have occurrences of the pandemic spiraling out of control.

Dr. Leana Wen, who previously served as Baltimore City Health Commissioner said: "We were able to control and contain the virus because of these shelter-in-place orders. Americans sacrificed so much for that to happen, people lost their jobs, while kids went out of school."

It was found that many places were unprepared and reopened far too soon which led to these latest surges in comparison to other countries like Europe, who lowered their case statistics by implementing longer lockdowns and only now have begun to slowly reopen. 

More than 2,347,000 have been infected across the US with the virus since the beginning of the pandemic. Their death toll climbed to at least 121,225 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University. 

The United States accounts for a quarter of both the world's total infections and total global deaths.

In Florida, it was found that Miami-Dade County as one of the hardest-hit areas in the state with patients requiring hospitalization to be younger and less sick. A physician reported that many infections can be attributed to community spread. The observation was found common by previous announcements made by many state leaders, particularly in the South who also highlighted cases that seemed to be shifting to the younger generation. 

Cases are on the decline in 14 states: Alaska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Indiana, Alabama, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, New York, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Jersey and Maryland.

Experts have alerted that even states who may be seeing temporary declines in cases could start noticing rises again as they begin reopening social venues and more residents venture out. 

 Mayor Bill de Blasio (New York), tweeted on Tuesday that beaches will be open for swimming starting July 1. "Let's keep playing it safe: social distance & face coverings, even at the beach!" 

Gov. Phil Murphy (New Jersey), urged the youth to continue following guidelines after reports from officials of more youngsters getting sick. "We've seen an increase in the percentage of #Covid-19 cases between the ages of 18-29," he said on Twitter. "Do the right thing. Wear a mask. Keep your distance. Wash your hands. Don't be a knucklehead."

Source: opera.com
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Top Comments
PSTADE · 06/25/2020
because of madness behavior and stupidity Arrogance, president told them what to do, no one listens,

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